Serious About Learning Dutch Online?

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3 Online Courses From 3 Companies Including Free Monthly & Payments For Learning Dutch Online.

£9.99 Monthy
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Plaform PC Tablet Mobile


3 Months For £20.99

Quarterly Subscription or More at Babbel

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Voted #1 By Users Worldwide

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2017 Best Value For Money

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£168.00 Yearly
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Try Free Demo

Rosseta Stone Free Demo Available (Great for Beginners who want to try before they buy.)

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Established since 1999

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Free live demo for new users

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Online Support and Help with courses

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Free Language App

Good App for users who want to brush up on their learning on the go. Lacks depth but good for revision and slow learning.

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Limited Learning

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Best used with a Paid Course

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Under 50 Hours of course

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Spoken by only around 23 million native speakers, the Dutch language belongs to the West Germanic family of languages. Most native speakers are located in Netherlands and Belgium. Modern Dutch was standardized in the Middle Ages, but this didn’t stop various regional dialects from developing. The distribution of these dialects depends on the original distribution of former mediaeval counties and duchies. According to the research by Geert Driessen, with both Dutch adults and youth, the use of dialects and regional languages is steadily declining.

Characteristics of the Dutch Language

The main characteristic that separates Dutch from other Germanic languages is the absence of phonological aspiration of consonants, which is characterized by a strong burst of breath. On the other hand, native German speakers usually find the grammar of the Dutch language to be very similar to the grammar of the German language. That being said, Dutch grammar often varies depending on the location of the speakers. For example, Standard Dutch uses three genders, but most speakers outside Belgium use only two.

Reasons to Learn the Dutch Language

People often underestimate just how widely the Dutch language is used. It’s not just Netherlands and Belgium where Dutch is useful—the language also is officially recognized by Caribbean islands of Aruba, Curaçao, and Sint Maarten.

Just like German, Dutch is closely related to English. Native English speakers and people who have learned English as a second language will find many grammar features of Dutch instantly familiar. Dutch and English also share common vocabulary, making it relatively easy to remember new words.

But what’s perhaps the most important, the vast majority of Dutch speakers are reasonably fluent in English! If you find yourself unable to remember the right word, you can just ask them in English and they will help you. This makes the learning process much less daunting.

Both Netherlands and Belgium are developed countries with rich cultural heritages and plenty of visit-worthy places. The knowledge of the Dutch language could possibly help you secure a very attractive job in a country with low unemployment and attractive social security benefits. Dutch speakers are known for their open-minded nature, hospitality, and progressive views. It doesn’t matter whether you learn Dutch at young age or later in life—native Dutch speakers will make you feel like you’re one of them.